from sky to seed

Slow and uncertain

We’ve had spikes and dips between hot weather and hard freezes all Spring, which has has stressed my poor little plants all winter. The last freeze killed just about every flower I transplanted. Heartbreaking! Truly! It’s the kind of failure that’s almost exclusive to gardening, which is one of the hobby’s great lessons: Very little is in your control.

My sweet little dirt patch.

My sweet little dirt patch.

 

And I’m not the only one suffering the brunt of crummy weather.

Winterkill on one of Jon's bermudagrass fields.

Winterkill on one of Jon’s bermudagrass fields.

Nonetheless, about half of the crops I planted have germinated and lived through the weather.

White Icicle Radish. These little babes are tough! They are my most successful crop so far.

White Icicle Radish. These little babes are tough! They are my most successful crop so far.

Snow peas.

Snow peas.

Crops that did not germinate: Every single kind of Chinese cabbage failed, which really surprised me. Last year, all of my cabbages did great in both my Spring and Fall gardens. The only thing I can think of that might have happened is that they came up quick and died in the freeze, or that they never came up at all. Maybe they were sown too deep?

Also, the tomatoes from my indoor seed starts still look beautiful.

IMG_2508IMG_2505

The winds have been absolutely howling out of the South, plus it’s been hot, and we’ve had T-storms with the threat of hail, so it’s not the best time to transplant while they’re still pretty little and fragile.

Will they make it?

Every day I ask myself that.

Damn, I hope so.

 

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